Project Beauty

Every once in a while I am challenged by the negative thinkers amongst us who somehow take pleasure in affirming how terrible everything is and try to convince me of that when I speak of the beauty in the world. Trying to convince these people otherwise is not something I have time for and I’m sure when I quickly remove myself from those conversations they think ‘see the world does suck and she can’t prove otherwise’ – but the truth is, I’m a very busy person and those that know me or follow my blog know I have 5 things I concentrate 95% of my energy on and trying to prove to negative people that there is hope and beauty in the world is not something I have time for, literally.

I’ve always been of the mindset of this quote from Anais Nin:

We don’t see things as they are, we see things as we are.

In every moment there is beauty if we are truly open and loving about life. The beauty of living with this mindset is that the more you project beauty and love, the more beauty and love you start to see in return. It’s kind of pointless to argue this with someone who has convinced themselves over a lifetime that life sucks. For that, I trust that life may teach them otherwise at some point.

Every thought and reaction to life we have, is sculpting our life. We are the producers.

Try this exercise for one day and you may never see your life the same again :

Give yourself a moment to center yourself before each interaction and consciously tell yourself to excel in the moment. By excel I don’t mean ‘win in the moment’ I mean ‘partner in the moment’ and be open to the beauty in it. This requires not being set in your way but open to what might transpire between people. Train yourself to respond to people around you with the highest level of dignity and compassion for yourself and them, and watch the magic happen.

If you surround yourself and engage in a spirit of community and charitable giving, and I mean giving of yourself and your resources, you will have more beauty in your life than you could imagine and to those that would argue that, I suggest, perhaps they are not giving enough.

"And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom." — Anaïs Nin

I am wishing you a week of new insights. May you see things in a way that alters your perspective of life for good.

 

3 comments

  • Michael

    Michael

    Carrie: Thank you for this beautiful entry! I understand and share your frustration with mindsets that are bent on seeing the world as a cruel, miserable place. We know, though, that there are many for whom misery is part of them because it has been their diet for so long, and justifiably so. It is hard to picture emptiness when sorrow and fear have been daily fare. As the film you posted on FB says, we must each choose love, and to love bravely, in order to create that world, to be the Sangha for those in deeper pain than we. And I guess that leads me to the point I wanted to make, that can't just be made with a "Nice blog, Carrie" statement. Thank you for the solidity of your practice. Mine has been tenuous of late, but is deepening daily. Your messages inspire and encourage, and have been support when I've needed them. Namaste, Michael

    Carrie:

    Thank you for this beautiful entry! I understand and share your frustration with mindsets that are bent on seeing the world as a cruel, miserable place. We know, though, that there are many for whom misery is part of them because it has been their diet for so long, and justifiably so. It is hard to picture emptiness when sorrow and fear have been daily fare. As the film you posted on FB says, we must each choose love, and to love bravely, in order to create that world, to be the Sangha for those in deeper pain than we.

    And I guess that leads me to the point I wanted to make, that can't just be made with a "Nice blog, Carrie" statement. Thank you for the solidity of your practice. Mine has been tenuous of late, but is deepening daily. Your messages inspire and encourage, and have been support when I've needed them.

    Namaste,
    Michael

  • Village

    Village

    Thank you so much Michael. Namaste

    Thank you so much Michael. Namaste

  • Michael

    Michael

    After re-reading this, I feel the need to clarify a point. Never is suffering justified. What I intended to say is that for many, sorrow and anger are understandable, given life circumstances (which of course is obvious). The invitation there, though, is to partner with those who hurt to help transform the hurt into fertile soil for insight into impermanence, interbeing and thereby, into love.

    After re-reading this, I feel the need to clarify a point. Never is suffering justified. What I intended to say is that for many, sorrow and anger are understandable, given life circumstances (which of course is obvious). The invitation there, though, is to partner with those who hurt to help transform the hurt into fertile soil for insight into impermanence, interbeing and thereby, into love.

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